Shoot Arrows, Hit Bullseyes at Highland Bow and Arrow

What do Susan Pevensie from Chronicles of Narnia, Katniss Everdeen from the Hunger Games, and Ygritte from Game of Thrones all have in common? They’re all fierce females who can rock a bow and arrow.

I discovered recently that — with a bit of instruction and practice — I can kick ass and hit bullseyes too.

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Last weekend, as part of Creative Soul Weekend, I got to unleash my inner archer at Highland Bow and Arrow near Wreck Cove along the Cabot Trail on the beautiful Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia.

I had a bit of experience shooting from my youth, but it had been many, many years since I’d picked up a bow.

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Since I was a little rusty, I benefitted from some expert instruction from the raddest owner/operator, Jay. Seriously, after overshooting the target on my own, it just took some minor correction from Jay and I hit the bullseye on the next shot. She lines the targets with balloons for some extra satisfaction as well!

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As an added bonus, Jay encourages moving around to play with different targets. Can I just point out how awesome some of these are? Um yes that is a scary zombie man and YES THAT IS A DINOSAUR.

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If you’re looking to empower your inner baddass bow-person, then I highly recommend making the trek out to Highland Bow & Arrow.

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Jay’s got something for everyone, including lessons for your little ones (or yourself), or just some straight up shooting practice.

What are you waiting for? Do it. #ShootArrows!

Check out more at highlandbowandarrow.ca or see if you can spot me and the Creative Soul gang on insta!

 

Design

 

How to Avoid Sticky Situations with Shelf Paper

As I mentioned in an earlier post, we are living the rental life here in Baltimore. That means, despite some of the features being in sore need of updating, we’re limited as to how much improvement we can actually make. Or, for that matter, how much time and how many resources we’re willing to invest.

That being said, the kitchen was in a sad state of affairs when we first arrived. After some major scrubbing, like, BIG TIME elbow grease, the cupboards still weren’t anywhere I wanted my dishes. Ultimately, I thought that the best measure would be to freshen up the cupboard interiors with some thick, clean, fresh, fun, clean, barrier-like, and did I mention clean?, shelf paper.

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If you’ve never tried lining your drawers or shelves, it can be easy to jump into the cutting and peeling and sticking head first. However, if that’s your method, you may soon find yourself in a sticky, rippled, ill-fitting mess.

First, make yourself a template! I cut mine from an empty cereal box. It doesn’t need to be fancy, it just needs to fit.

Once you’ve measured and fit your template, you’ll find that most shelf paper has handy-dandy grids on the back to help with cutting nice straight lines.

After cutting out your shelf and drawer pieces in the correct sizes, DON’T DO ANYTHING ELSE.

Okay, I just wanted to make sure I had your attention before you got sticker happy and started peeling off the backs of the paper.

Before that oh-so-satisfying-step, you should lay out all the papers in their places just to have a final guarantee that they all fit properly.

Okay, have you done that?

Guess what?

Now, yes, NOW, you can start to peel the stickers.

But, and you’re going to love this part, there’s another trick involved!

If you’re bubble-averse like I am, then this method is a life saver.

I call it “the underneath-er quicker sticker”

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haha No I don’t.

If I did, though, it would be an accurate and effective description. Basically, you want to peel the backing away slowly from below, while applying even pressure to the top and smoothing away bubbles as you go.

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Finally, you can trim any uneven edges with a craft knife but that’s only if you’re a stickler for edges like I am.

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You’re done! You did it! Hooray!

Now for some sweet Befores & Afters

From BLAH to BAM!

Not too shabby, eh?

Hope this is helpful for your shelf lining efforts!

Design

 

Unhelpful Recipes: Newfoundland Wild Blueberry Icebox Cake

I just returned from a trip to Newfoundland to stay in the home my great-grandparents built in the forties. It was just lovely to explore the natural beauty of the province we call “The Rock” and, amongst the other fine experiences, was how special it was to prepare food in my great grandmother’s kitchen.

While my Nanny took the time to prepare blueberry pies from scratch, I opted for a simpler way to make use of the abundant wild blueberries that grow all around the property.

If you’ve never made an icebox cake, then you are in for a treat! They are easy peasy and so delicious. Not to mention, they have something of a vintage appeal to the “baking” style.

All you need is a handful of ingredients and the best part? It’s no bake!

Newfoundland Wild Blueberry Icebox Cake

Ingredients:

  • Graham Crackers
  • Whipped Cream (sweetened, if that’s your preference)
  • Wild Newfoundland Blueberries

Design

If you’re feeling extra authentic, start with some charming depression glass bowls or one large vintage serving dish!

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Directions:

  • Alternate layers of delicious ingredients
  • Chill in the fridge for several hours
  • And that’s it!

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Basically, the graham crackers absorb the moisture from the whipped cream and become cake-like. I opted to use coconut whipped cream on account of my lactose intolerance but regular dairy works the same. Feel free to add a splash of vanilla or icing sugar to your liking.

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Oh, and most importantly, share with friends.

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